Photo Credit: Lindsey Holman

Photo Credit: Lindsey Holman

This winter the Art Department at the University of West Georgia has all forms of art displayed in the Juried Art Exhibition. It will feature over 60 pieces of art created by art majors and other students that are not involved in the program. Each year over 80 art pieces are submitted to the juror that is hired to choose which entries will be in the show’s exhibit.

“It’s open to any student to submit work, not just art students,” said Stephanie Smith who is a lecturer and the gallery coordinator for the show.

The juror is someone that is selected every year who has significant education as well as experience with art. This year Justin Rabideau, the director of the Zuckerman Museum of Art at Kennesaw State University, has been chosen as the juror for this years exhibit.

“We select an individual who will see things and select [art pieces] with certain connections and meanings,” said Smith.

Students enter five pieces through digital entry and the juror will accept or reject it. He selected 50 to 70 pieces for the show.

“He ended up selecting 64 pieces,” said Smith. “It’s very competitive. It really was a very competitive process.”

The mediums of art that will be featured in the exhibit include watercolor and acrylic paintings, woodcuts, screen prints, sculptures, metal art, ceramic pieces and graphic design.

“This show is different because you have an outside juror and someone who has not seen their work before,” said Smith. “Its also good for students how to project their work to an audience.”

On Feb.13 in the Humanities building, there will be an opening reception where the juror will talk about the selections and why he chose the pieces he did. He will also hand out prizes for first, second and third and some merit awards.

"Do Not Discard" Photo Credit: Lindsey Holman

“Do Not Discard”
Photo Credit: Lindsey Holman

“My artwork entitled ‘Please Do Not Discard’ in the 2014 Student Juried Art Show is a ceramic sculpture series consisting of Anagama kiln fired ceramic fragments/refuse, found steel rods, found concrete bases, wire and chain,” said Natasha Stansel, a senior who is pursuing Bachelors in Art Education and an emphasis in photography.

“To be honest, I must say that failure is what inspired me to create this series,” said Stansel. “The most difficult aspect of this project was experimenting with different drill bits trying to find one that would drill through the Anagama kiln fired ware.”

Lauren G. Koch, a senior pursuing bachelor in Art Education with Emphasis in Printmaking along with Piano Performance with Emphasis in Piano Pedagogy, submitted an art piece that would place under the title of screen-printing. The self-printed work of art is called There’s Always Time for Tea and it was finished using the printing process named serigraphy or screen-printing.

“As I created my concept, I was inspired to show how a product that is traditionally a ritual based item and prized by certain cultures could become a consumerist product,” said Koch. “ The drinking of hot tea for many people still is very ritualistic, yet for a large number of us it has become part of our everyday life and I wanted celebrate that.”

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