In relation to gun laws, America is a laughing stock in the global arena. The international community is completely baffled by America’s decision to hold onto its guns despite the staggering number of gun-related deaths. America still does not understand why it should take control over its guns. In contrast, it continues to dig the hole deeper by advocating the allowance of guns on campus.

Eight states already allow students to carry concealed guns on public college campuses, and Georgia is now rooting for the same. House Bill 859, nicknamed the “campus carry bill” would allow Georgia to join these states and currently stands in the Senate awaiting a decision.

Supporters of campus carry believe allowing guns will make campus safer and stop mass shootings, but armed, 20-somethings could end in disaster.

Even students at Umpqua Community College in Oregon, one of the eight states permitting campus carry, could not stop the mass shooting in October 2015 which cost the lives of 10 souls. Despite some students at Umpqua carrying weapons, they did not come forward to stop the shooting spree.

According to Thomas Mackel, chief of police at UWG, some Umpqua students feared for their own live if they were to interject themselves into the situation, both from the shooter and from police if they were to arrive on scene and not know who the original perpetrator was.

Students will continuously face stress, depression and, many times, abuse of drugs and alcohol. They will encounter the everyday motions of life. Only now, with access to guns.

In addition to regular gun laws, which require a person to be 21 and over and have a gun license to carry firearms, the bill has also restricted places carrying guns is allowed. They would not be permitted at sorority and fraternity houses or athletic events.

Campus carry will jeopardize the whole education system. The faculty and staff need to remain on high alert; no more flunking grades or healthy, yet heated, arguments, because it may cost lives.

At the rate this bill is being promoted, grading at gunpoint could become the next big trend. Universities should forget about hiring qualified faculty; fear of life takes precedence over pay, and they may flee to states where being shot during their office hours is not a concern.

Forget about shooting others. The possibility of self-harm and accidents are a big threat, too. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, during 2001 to 2013, out of all the gun -related deaths, three out of five were suicides, just shy of 60 percent of total gun-related deaths. Homicides followed at almost 40 percent. Passing the campus carry bill does not only put others at risk but also the gun carriers, who have easy access to the weapon. In this microwave generation, where everything needs to be done under two minutes, a gun in the hand of a suicidal student could result in decisions made faster than a Facebook post – no second thoughts, no rationalizing, just execution.

Passing the campus carry bill would further incapacitate the already lagging education system of America. Mass shootings will remain the same regardless of carrying firearms; a minor verbal dispute may lead to gun fights sooner than imaginable; the number of new faculty, staff and students coming to campus carry states may decrease; emotional distress and easy access to guns will increase successful suicide rates; faculty will have to alter teaching methods to appease all students and not aggravate any. Thus, the entire higher education system in the state of Georgia will go haywire.

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