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UWG Theatre Showcases “Fuddy Meers”

Works of fiction are commonly constructed within specific genres to appeal to the tastes or the mood of the individual. However, genres often blend together, not merely to enhance the plot, but to offer complexity and depth to the story. Dark comedies are known for using humor to tackle heavy and complex issues that may otherwise turn off those who hesitate towards such subject matter.

Breanna Tillie

Works of fiction are commonly constructed within specific genres to appeal to the tastes or the mood of the individual. However, genres often blend together, not merely to enhance the plot, but to offer complexity and depth to the story. Dark comedies are known for using humor to tackle heavy and complex issues that may otherwise turn off those who hesitate towards such subject matter. 

The University of West Georgia’s theatre program is showcasing the dark comedy, “Fuddy Meers,” from Feb. 20 to Feb. 24 at 7:30 p.m. and Feb. 25 at 2:30 p.m. Though the play features weighty topics such as amnesia, trauma and abuse, its comedic storytelling keeps these themes engaging and approachable.

“Don’t let the plot fool you, it’s actually really hilarious,” said Austin Sharpe, an actor in the production. “But in it being so funny, it lets the audience take their guard down. Through all of the jokes, quips, funny physical blocking and action, it gets the audience vulnerable to the really deep and emotional parts of it.”

“Fuddy Meers” touches on themes of reliability and people not being honest, making it easy for the audience to feel sympathetic toward the characters involved. Everyone has experienced the frustration of not knowing what to believe or who to believe. 

“There’s a lot of mistrust and misguided information. It’s trying to figure out for yourself who you are and what other people mean to you,” said Sharpe. “You’ll connect with a lot of the characters.”

“Fuddy Meers” also touches on themes of trauma and its effects, displaying how people are complicated and how the distressing events that someone experiences can shape them into the person that they are. However, the play is not simply putting the trauma on display for the sake of entertainment. Those in the audience who have experienced traumatic events will be inspired by the perseverance of the characters and the showing of their healing and getting better. 

“There’s a lot of trauma in it. A lot of the characters have gone through some immensely awful things,” said Sharpe. “But the play shows them pressing on, moving forward and trying to recover from these things as well.”

Trauma can often feel overwhelming and cause a feeling of utter helplessness and disarray. The play exhibits the reality of that feeling while also offering encouragement and hope. 

“You see Claire struggle and you can’t help but feel sympathy for her. There’s one part in the show when Claire tells her mother that she doesn’t know who to trust, she doesn’t know what she’s being told and she doesn’t know what’s going on,” said Sharpe. “Trauma can create that feeling of not knowing what to do and feeling very overwhelmed. However, the play shows people being there for Claire and helping to bring her out of that. It’ll be really encouraging to see that.” 

“Fuddy Meers” will be performed on a three-quarter thrust stage, with the audience being on three sides of the stage.

“It’s a very intimate stage. We’re right there interacting with the audience and I always feel like it helps them connect with the piece a lot more,” said Sharpe. “At the same time, it can be a challenge because we have to make sure that we’re constantly present and focused, intent with everything you do because everyone can see you at all times. But still, it’s a lot of fun and I can’t wait to have that nice interaction with the audience.”

Sharpe praises the hard work and dedication of the theater department and encourages students to be supportive and attend the production. 

“There are so many amazing people,” said Sharpe. “Along with the actors, there are so many great student designers and people working behind the scenes doing such a great job.” 

Potential viewers should take into consideration that the play does contain swearing, fighting and elements of abuse.